CTSA 2016 Priority – Tilapia Farming Development

Tilapia has been identified as one of the most desired species for aquaculture farming throughout the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA) region. Although most farming technology is available, the development and expansion of tilapia farming still faces regional challenges. One of the highest priorities in recent years has been stock improvement, and much work has been done in that area. CTSA encourages studies to continue improving the productivity of tilapia farming, and has identified the following top priorities for FY2016:

1) Develop protocols to ensure the quality of the final products.

2) Improve regional access to disease-free tilapia with high-quality genetic traits.

Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture
41-202 Kalaniana’ole Highway
Waimanalo, HI 96795

Additional Resources:

First Latin American Company To Offer Four-Star BAP Tilapia

Paraiso Springs Aquaculture Guatemala is Latin America’s first company qualified to offer four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) tilapia, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in early March.

The company became eligible to offer four-star BAP tilapia with the BAP certification of its hatchery. Its new processing plant and farm — located in Caserio Los Angeles, San Luis Peten, Guatemala — are already BAP certified, as are the feed mills from which it sources feed, Areca Feed Mill in Guatemala and Cargill de Honduras.

Four-star BAP status denotes that the product originates from a BAP-certified processing plant, farm, hatchery and feed mill. It’s the highest achievement in the BAP program.

“We are very proud of the hard work our crew put forth to obtain BAP four-star certification. It certainly is an accomplishment for a small family-run operation like Paraiso Springs. This is a big part of our quality commitment to our clients and community,” said Alejandro Palomo, president of Paraiso Springs Aquaculture Guatemala.

Currently, worldwide, there are 74 BAP-certified tilapia processing plants and 68 BAP-certified tilapia farms, representing more than 175,000 metric tons annually.

About BAP
A division of the Global Aquaculture Alliance, Best Aquaculture Practices is an international certification program based on achievable, science-based and continuously improved performance standards for the entire aquaculture supply chain — farms, hatcheries, processing plants and feed mills — that assure healthful foods produced through environmentally and socially responsible means. BAP certification is based on independent audits that evaluate compliance with the BAP standards developed by the Global Aquaculture Alliance.

Aquaculture Division Reports Positive Results in Tilapia Farming Research

LAS VEGAS, NV–(Marketwired – Mar 14, 2016) – Alkame Holdings, Inc. (OTC: ALKM), a publicly traded health and wellness technology holding company with a focus on patentable, innovative, and eco-friendly products, is pleased to announce positive results in Aquaculture farming using its patented water treatment technology.

Alkame Holdings Inc. teamed up with Keeton Industries, Seaworth Farms, Alpine Aquaculture and Wellington Operating Company, and constructed a research system in Wellington, Colorado and studied the effects of Alkame’s patented technology when applied to intensive recirculating aquaculture systems. The research was conducted with Tilapia, and according to Wikipedia, Tilapia is currently the fourth most popular type of fish behind tuna, salmon and Alaskan Pollock, and the third most popular aquaculture or farm raised seafood product behind shrimp and salmon globally. More than 80 nations produce and farm tilapia, including the United States. The US produces 10 thousand tons of Tilapia against a consumption of 2.5 million, with Americans consuming over 1 pound of tilapia per person each year. Farmed tilapia production is about 1.5 million tons annually, with an estimated value of $1.8 billion (USD), about equal to that of salmon and trout.

Testing of the Alkame Technology is led by scientist and consulting biologist, Jim Keeton, a proven expert in this field. Jim Keeton and Keeton Industries has remained at the forefront of developing aquatic technology for successful fish farming, and has actively been involved in experimentation, design and manufacture of various components and equipment of sustainable design and engineering of intensive aquaculture systems, operations, and manufacturing solutions, with more than 40 years of experience.

“The major advantage of Alkame technology is that it can completely or partially destroy organics in water by converting them into various harmless intermediates and end products,” stated lead scientist Jim Keeton. “Alkame’s advanced system and design ensures that high concentrations of dissolved oxidants are released to the water when circulated across the cells, reducing Nitrites by 50 %. Clarity and solids were also substantially reduced from 4 inches to over 20 inches after oxidation within 48 hours. Tannins and Lignin’s from feed leaching were removed with the Alkame process along with organic solids creating clearer and healthier water conditions. These factors could substantially reduce the size and costs of bio-filtration design for intensive recirculation systems.”

“Our studies show that the Alkame Technology aids in the overall health of the water, which in turn creates a healthier environment to raise the fish. The Tilapia benefit by lowering the mortality rate (less than 2% mortality), accelerating growth (1 gram to about 38 to 50 grams in less than 60 days), and by reducing the size and cost to the bottom line of bio-filtration efficiency. Producing a cleaner healthier water for the Tilapia is a game changer for Aquaculture systems, and the industry as a whole worldwide,” stated Alkame CEO, Robert Eakle. “After many months of research, and gathering up all of this encouraging hard analytical data, we can now begin to move towards exploiting our technology in this massive industry through various partnerships and joint ventures or licensing arrangements. We are very much looking forward to the pursuit of this application for our IP,” Eakle added.

About Alkame Holdings, Inc.

Alkame Holdings, Inc. is a publicly traded health and wellness technology holding company, with a focus on patentable, innovative, and eco-friendly consumer products. The Company’s wholly-owned subsidiaries market and distribute enhanced waters utilizing an exclusive patented formula and technology to create water with several unique properties, enabling an increase to available oxygen content, optimized pH levels, as well as the added benefits of electrolytes, and enhancement of antioxidant properties, equating into many potential health benefits, such as a reduced structure for permeability, improved metabolic efficiency, a boosted immune system, improved cardio respiratory function, and a decrease in lactic acid for faster muscle recovery. The organization is diligently building a strong foundation through the launch and acquisition of appropriate business assets, and by pursuing multiple applications to utilize its Intellectual Property by placement into several emerging business sectors, such as the growing aqua-culture industry, consumer bottled water and RTD products, household pet products, horticulture and agriculture applications, as well as many other various water treatment solutions to both new and existing business platforms.

For more information, visit www.alkameholdingsinc.com

Aquaculture Symposium to Focus on Infectious Diseases of Tilapia & Strip Catfish

Aquaculture Symposium taking place on 24 of March all day at Meeting Room 2 (3rd floor) of SECC in Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam which focus on Infectious diseases of Tilapia & Strip catfish invite 4 Fisheries experts from Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand and the specialist in Tilapia from Vietnam to join the session.

The interesting topics are Franciscellosis, Streptococcosis, Columnaris disease in Tilapia and Strip catfish and Concurrent infection & Miscellaneous diseases, Antibiotic resistance in Aquaculture, Vaccine for Tilapia and Strip catfish and close session with Viral Nervous necrosis in Tilapia. This class is special for fish farmer to understand and study how to solve the infectious diseases of Tilapia and strip catfish in Vietnam. FAVA believe that this class will create the valuable knowledge for all delegate and the 120 seats are limited.

All conference program, please visit here

For more information of ILDEX Vietnam 2016, please visit www.ILDEX-VIETNAM.com

Does selection in a challenging environment produce Nile tilapia genotypes that can thrive in a range of production systems?

Authors: Ngo Phu Thoa, Nguyen Huu Ninh, Wayne Knibb & Nguyen Hong Nguyen

Abstract

This study assessed whether selection for high growth in a challenging environment of medium salinity produces tilapia genotypes that perform well across different production environments. We estimated the genetic correlations between trait expressions in saline and freshwater using a strain of Nile tilapia selected for fast growth under salinity water of 15–20 ppt. We also estimated the heritability and genetic correlations for new traits of commercial importance (sexual maturity, feed conversion ratio, deformity and gill condition) in a full pedigree comprising 36,145 fish. The genetic correlations for the novel characters between the two environments were 0.78–0.99, suggesting that the effect of genotype by environment interaction was not biologically important. Across the environments, the heritability for body weight was moderate to high (0.32–0.62), indicating that this population will continue responding to future selection. The estimates of heritability for sexual maturity and survival were low but significant. The additive genetic components also exist for FCR, gill condition and deformity. Genetic correlations of harvest body weight with sexual maturity were positive and those between harvest body weight with FCR were negative. Our results indicate that the genetic line selected under a moderate saline water environment can be cultured successfully in freshwater systems.

See full article

Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 21486 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep21486

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

 

South Dakota Aquaculture Contacts

Agencies / Regulatory

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks
20641 SD Highway 1806
Fort Pierre, SD 57532
Tel: 605.223.7660

Education and Extension

South Dakota Department of Agriculture
523 East Capitol Avenue
Joe Foss Building, 3rd Floor
Pierre, SD 57501
Tel: 605.773.5425

South Dakota State University
Brookings, SD 57007
Tel:
1.800.952.3541

South Dakota Tilapia Culture

Regulations

State regulations and required permits go through SD Game Fish & Parks Department. The contact person for you would be

Will Sayler
Fisheries Program Administrator
Production and Development
South Dakota Dept. Game, Fish and Parks
523 E. Capitol Ave
Pierre, SD 57501
Tel: 605-773-4501
Will.sayler@state.sd.us

References

Feed experiment to increase nutritional value of tilapia

1 February 2016 – WorldFish scientists will begin to experiment with feed ingredients that can increase the nutritional value of tilapia as part of a new project.

AquaLINC, funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), aims to increase supplies of fish that are more affordable and have a higher nutritional content for consumers in Egypt and Bangladesh. Implemented by WorldFish, the project will focus on developing production models for tilapia that meet the demands of resource poor consumers and are profitable for producers and retailers.

Using feed-additives to increase the Omega 3, and micronutrient content of farmed fish will have significant benefits for all, but especially for resource poor consumers who are more likely to be under nourished.

Recent WorldFish research in Egypt and Bangladesh suggests poor consumers typically prefer purchasing less expensive, smaller fish while aquaculture production systems in both countries are increasingly geared towards producing larger fish. Focusing on a popular farmed fish, tilapia, AquaLINC will examine the business case for how to increase the production and market for smaller fish.

Smaller fish which consume less feed and have shorter lifecycles may reduce the environmental footprint for fish production, another research area for the project.

Nigel Preston, Director General, WorldFish: “We are committed to innovations that will promote pro-poor fish value chains. Increased consumption of fish in nutritionally insecure parts of the world will improve food and nutrition security.”

AquaLINC will establish enabling conditions for the development and expansion of pro-poor tilapia value chains in Bangladesh and Egypt by testing the economic and technical feasibility of producing more nutrient-rich and smaller-sized fish and its acceptance by poor consumers. These innovations are expected to lead to: improved quality of fish; increased consumption of fish by the poor, particularly for nutritionally vulnerable populations (women of reproductive age and young children); and lower environmental impacts in fish production.

The three-year project will build on current research on the nutrition and health benefits of fish. It will also add to the research on increasing the affordability of fish for poor consumers and a growing body of work on the environmental impact of farmed fish production.

For more information or to request an interview contact:

Toby Johnson, Senior Media Relations Manager
Mobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606
Email: t.johnson@cgiar.org
Web: worldfishcenter.org

Philippines BFAR releases 300,000 tilapia fingerlings for Abra fisherfolk

BANGUED, Abra, Jan. 19(PIA)- – The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) regional office  released this month a total of 300,000 tilapia fingerlings  to  the province.

According to Provincial Fishery Officer Mr. Jesus Astrero, these fingerlings are distributed to fish folks and fish pond owners in the municipalities of Lagangilang, Sallapadan, Peñarrubia, Lagayan, Bucay, Pilar, Bangued, Dolores, San Juan, Tubo and Tayum.

“Other tilapia fingerlings will be placed in communal body of water or rivers while fingerlings left in the office will be dispersed in Calaba River,” he said.

These fingerlings are expected to grow in number to help the community have additional source of living.

The first stock of fingerlings from BFAR was requested by Governor Eustaquio P. Bersamin to augment the loss resulting from strong typhoons that struck the province last year. (JDP/GBB- PIA CAR, Abra)

Safety Concerns & Healthier Eating Trends Driving Change and Opportunity for U.S. Seafood Producers

Homebred Tilapia producers are best positioning themselves for the paradigm shift already under way

BONITA, CA – December 23, 2015 —  Few realize it, but the United States’ seafood market is worth a whopping $60 billion, mostly shrimp. Even more amazing, most consumed seafood in the U.S. is imported. This is good news for New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS:  NGEY), who seeks to close the loop on fully sustainable fish farming that’s safe and healthy for Americans.

With greater oversight and greater scrutiny of the seafood industry falling into place, however, United States consumers are understandably hesitant to consume more fish. Not only is the quality of this foreign seafood being increasingly questioned, safety concerns are now the norm.

Perhaps no other sliver of the seafood market has been held back by quality and safety concerns as much as tilapia has. That concern is creating opportunity for American providers, however, which can verify and validate their fish, is not only of the highest quality, but meets the highest safety standards.

It’s this aspect of the maturing U.S. tilapia market  in fact, the SmallCap Network research staff believes could provide a potentially compelling opportunity for investors in 2016.

In spite of the country’s capable seafood production business, more than 90% of the seafood eaten in the United States is imported. Tilapia is no exception. The majority of the tilapia eaten in the U.S. comes from China, Indonesia, Ecuador, and Honduras, just to name a few. Not all of these countries necessarily have the same safety and quality standards the U.S. may have. And, perhaps worse, even where standards are strong, the enforcement of those standards may or may not be consistent.

As an illustration of the concern, a 2009 report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, noted that over the course of the eight prior years, a great deal of the tilapia imported from China had been banned from being shipped to the U.S. because those “fish are often raised in ponds where they feed on waste from poultry and livestock.”

Of course, even where farm-raised tilapia isn’t consuming waste, mercury consumption is an ongoing and valid concern.

It’s not to say all Chinese fish farms are guilty of breeding tilapia in conditions that make them unsafe for consumption, and to the country’s credit, enforcement of minimal standards is improving. But, with 200 million small, independent aquafarms of less than two acres per farm coupled with the fact that China produces a whopping 40% of the world’s tilapia supply, regulatory oversight is still tenuous at best.

It’s unfortunate tilapia’s reputation has been damaged too, as it’s a particularly good source of protein. Aside from being a source of omega-3 fatty acids (which are important for brain function), one serving of tilapia can provide half the daily recommended amount of protein intake.

It’s this convergence of growing demand for tilapia and fear of consuming it that has presented an opportunity for U.S.-based providers, who can breed the fish safely and effectively, and in a venue that’s easy for consumers and regulators to verify is safe and clean.

Individual companies like New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS: NGEY) are quietly working to lead the charge.

Those who know New Global Energy well likely know it as a Moringa farm. Moringa is the world’s newest superfood, rich in nutrients and full of antioxidants. However, the Company’s entry into the Moringa business was actually fueled by New Global’ s aim to grow its own fish feed, so it would know exactly what its tilapia were consuming.

New Global Energy, through its subsidiary Aqua Farming Tech, has also gone to great lengths as well as expense, to ensure the water it breeds its fish in is properly filtered, safe, and clean.  This new found process of full sustainability is receiving rapid growth adoption across many industries.

The bulk of New Global Energy’s aqua farming growth plans are in front of it. As was recently noted in seafood industry publication Undercurrent News, the company aims to produce 27,500 pounds of tilapia per week by the first quarter of 2017, and the potential addition of a third and possibly even a fourth fish farm could ramp up that level of output. That translates into a few million in annual tilapia sales, making NGEY a potentially exciting prospect for investors.