Category Archives: Aquaponics

Tilapia Market Expects Reduction in Tilapia Price to Boost Demand Significantly

The Tilapia Market deals with the development and distribution of the cichlid fish. Tilapia fingerlings belong to tribe known as tilapiine cichlid and number in around 100 different species. Fresh tilapia are largely restricted to freshwater bodies like ponds, lakes and rivers.

The Tilapia Market has recently come into prominence as the fields of aquaculture and aquaponics gain in size and revenue. Tilapia farming is extremely popular owing to the low price of live tilapia, ease of preparing tilapia food due to its boneless nature and its mildness as far as taste is concerned. The low tilapia price has ensure that it is usually among the top 5 fresh seafood varieties consumed in the US.

Scope & Regional Forecast of the Tilapia Market

In recent years, the Tilapia Market has witnessed that fresh tilapia species from North Africa are most popular on a commercial basis. This popularity is due to peculiar characteristics like rapid pace of growth, high tolerance to density of stocking, and high levels of adaptability. This species is pretty popular in Asia. On the other hand, the US is a very popular destination for frozen tilapia. China is not only the leading exporter of this variety, but also of whole tilapia.

Traditionally, the European Union has been a big market for fresh seafood. But in recent times, imports have declined as only Germany and Netherlands are exhibiting a strong appetite for tilapia fingerlings. Vietnam’s tilapia farming operations has received a significant amount of encouragement from the government in the form of various initiatives and research studies. Supply links between various major parties like producers, processors and international distributors have also been strengthened in the country.

While there is heavy competition for other cheap fish varieties, the demand for live tilapia is expected to hold steady. The demand is also expected to spike on an annual basis due to the Chinese New Year.

Segmentations & Key Manufacturers Involved in the Tilapia Market

The Tilapia Market can be broken down into various segmentations on the basis of –

Manufacturer: China, Egypt, USA, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Ecuador, Myanmar, Malaysia, Uganda and Bangladesh.

Application: Household Consumption and Business.

Type: Tilapia and Tilapia Fillet.

Geographical Location: North America (USA, Canada and Mexico), Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) and Latin America, Middle East and Africa.

Contact:  To purchase report, see www.marketintelreports.com

Egyptian tilapia promoted at La Cuisine International Food Festival

WorldFish provided 100 Kilograms of its fresh Abbassa tilapia to be cooked by the Egyptian Chefs Association (ECA) at La Cuisine Festival held in Cairo, Egypt, on 10 December.

The festival saw 1500 guests from around the world to sample dishes from chefs from countries including Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Morocco, Italy, France, Spain, Japan, China, Korea, Indonesia, India, Russia, Mexico, in addition to Egypt.

Egypt is the world’s second largest producer of tilapia, producing more than one million tons per year. With almost all of the tilapia production consumed locally, WorldFish, along with other feeding companies and stakeholders of the sector in Egypt, are working on promoting farmed tilapia as an affordable, tasty and healthy source of protein for all Egyptians.

Malcolm Dickson, Program Manager for WorldFish said: “In Egypt, 27% of the population live in poverty and suffer from high rates of childhood stunting. This is why WorldFish is keen to promote tilapia as a cheap and nutritious source of protein for the poor. However, the market for tilapia needs to be expanded to all sectors of the population. Events such as La Cuisine, might make people think again about the type of fish they prepare for their families”.

This was the second cooperation between WorldFish and ECA after the first taste test workshop hosted by WorldFish on 29 August 2016 at the Abbassa Research Center. The first workshop aimed at introducing high quality Egyptian Abbassa strain tilapia to twenty of Egypt’s top chefs.

The Egyptian tilapia stand was sponsored by WorldFish along with leading private sector companies under the umbrella of the Aquatic Union for Fisheries Cooperatives.

Mohamed Gouda, Committee member of the Aquatic Union for Fisheries Cooperatives explained: “The Egyptian Tilapia was presented in four recipes which were a great success in this international festival. The Aquatic Union for Fisheries Cooperatives will continue its support for this fish along with the stakeholders of the aquaculture sector, by establishing the ‘Support Fund for Egyptian tilapia’. Its main role is to build the market reputation for tilapia and develop new aquaculture and marketing methods. In this context, a cooperation protocol with all stakeholders including research centers, aquaculture cooperatives, feeding companies and large fish farming businesses, is under preparation.”

For more information or to request an interview contact:

Toby Johnson, Head of Communications
Mobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606
Email: t.johnson@cgiar.org
Web: worldfishcenter.org

About WorldFish
WorldFish is an international, nonprofit research organization that harnesses the potential of fisheries and aquaculture to reduce hunger and poverty. Globally, more than one billion poor people obtain most of their animal protein from fish and 800 million depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. WorldFish is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future.

About CGIAR
CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partners.

Global Aqua Feed Market Driven by Growth of the Aquaculture Industry

The field of aquaculture has, over the decades, witnessed significant growth owing to the surging demand for aquatic food stuffs, which in turn, has resulted in the increased demand for aqua feed. A report studying the performance of the global aqua feed market has been recently added to the colossal database of Market Research Reports Search Engine (MRRSE). The 88-page research report is titled “Aqua Feed Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 – 2019” and is a concise yet information-packed analysis of the global aqua feed market.

Browse Full Report with TOC : www.mrrse.com/aqua-feed-market

The research study highlights the major factors driving the aqua feed market and those that prove to be a hindrance to its development. According to the report, the global aqua feed market is fueled by the escalating consumption of fish and the growth of the aquaculture market. Rising demand for functional and conventional aqua feed from China and other Asian countries is bound to present the global market with strong opportunities for growth. However, the volatile nature of the prices of raw materials is a key factor challenging the development of the aqua feed market.

The aqua feed market is segmented on the basis of end use and region in order to fully understand and interpret the workings of the global market. On the basis of end use, the aqua feed market is categorized into mollusks, crustaceans, salmon, carps, tilapia, catfish, and others. On the basis of region, the aqua feed market is divided into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World. Figures pertaining to demand, revenue, volume, and value are provided in the report from 2012 to 2019.

The research report includes a detailed section on the vendor landscape of the aqua feed market, in which leading competitors are identified and profiled on the basis of attributes such as company overview, product portfolio, financial standing, business strategy, and recent developments. A SWOT analysis of each of these companies studies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats faced during the forecast period. In addition, the report also makes use of Porter’s five forces analysis to understand the impact of suppliers, buyers, new entrants, substitutes, and rivals.

The most significant players operating in the global aqua feed market include Cermaq ASA, Avanti Feeds Ltd., Tongwei, Alltech Inc., Ridley Corporation, Norel Animal Nutrition, NK Ingredients Pte Ltd., Dibaq Aquaculture, Nutreco N.V., Aller Aqua A/S, Charoen Pokphand Foods Public Company Limited, Cargill Incorporated, BioMar A/S, Nutriad, and Beneo GmbH.

Contact:
Rohit Bhisey
Head – Internet Marketing
+1-518-730-0559

Scientists net virus behind tilapia die-offs in Israel and Ecuador

An international scientific team led by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Tel Aviv University has identified and characterized a novel virus behind massive die-offs of farmed tilapia in Israel and Ecuador, which threatens the $7.5 billion global tilapia industry. A paper in the journal mBio describes tilapia lake virus (TiLV) and provides information needed to fight the outbreak.

Known in its native Middle East as St. Peter’s fish and thought to be the biblical fish that fed multitudes, tilapia provides inexpensive dietary protein. The world’s second most farmed fish, tilapia is also the basis of aquaculture employment in developing countries in Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. (The United States is the leading tilapia importer globally.) Since 2009, Israel has seen precipitous declines in tilapia, with annual yields plummeting as much as 85 percent–highly unusual considering the fish is known to be relatively resistant to viral infections. Similar die-offs have been seen in Ecuador and Colombia.

Diseased tilapia

Tilapia diseased from tilapia lake virus infection, Ecuador. Photo: Hugh Ferguson.

The scientists used high-throughput sequencing to determine the genetic code of the virus from tissue taken from diseased fish in Israel and Ecuador. This process would normally be sufficient to identify the culprit, but in this case, the resulting DNA sequences didn’t match any known virus, with the exception of a small genetic segment, that only remotely resembled a virus associated with the reproduction of influenza C.

Undeterred, the researchers employed other tools from their scientific tackle box, providing ample evidence that the genetic material was the same as the implicated virus dubbed TiLV. They used mass spectroscopy to characterize the proteins in cells growing the virus, which matched those they expected to see based on the genetic sequence. By analyzing the structure of viral DNA, they went on to observe 10 gene clusters with complementary endpoints, suggesting a circular form associated with a common type of viral reproduction involving a protein called a polymerase.

Finally and conclusively, healthy fish were exposed to TiLV cultured in a laboratory, resulting in disease that matched with what was seen in those countries: in Israel, the fish had swollen brains; in Ecuador, liver disease. In the coming weeks, the researchers will publish on the link between the TiLV and an outbreak of disease among tilapia in Colombia.

“The TiLV sequence has only minimal similarity in a small region of its genome to other viruses; thus, the methods we typically use to identify and characterize viruses through sequencing alone were insufficient,” says first author Eran Bacharach, a molecular virologist at Tel Aviv University.

“It appears to be most closely related to a family of influenza viruses called orthomyxoviruses; however, we still don’t understand much about its biology,” adds Nischay Mishra, associate research scientist at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia’s Mailman School.

Importantly, the findings provide the genomic and protein sequences necessary for TiLV detection, containment, and vaccine development.

“We are shifting our focus now to implementing diagnostic tests for containment of infection and to developing vaccines to prevent disease,” says Avi Eldar of the Kimron Veterinary Institute in Bet Dagan, Israel.

The team of 18 researchers represent five institutions in four countries: the Center for Infection and Immunity and the New York Genome Center in the U.S., Tel Aviv University and Kimron Veterinary Institute in Israel; the University of Edinburgh, Scotland; and St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies.

“The New York Genome Center was excited to join in characterizing this novel virus and contribute to this important environmental and globally impactful research,” says Toby Bloom, the Center’s deputy scientific director.

“Gumshoe epidemiology, molecular gymnastics and classical microbiological methods were required to link this new virus to disease,” says Ian Lipkin, senior author, director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and John Snow Professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School. “Resolution of this mystery was only possible through the concerted efforts of this talented group of international collaborators.”

While best known for identifying viruses behind human disease, the Center for Infection and Immunity, pinpointed the virus beyond a disease that decimated salmon farms in Europe in 2010. They have done similar work with seals, sea lions, and Great Apes.

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The current research was supported by grants from the United States-Israel Bi-National Agricultural Research & Development Fund (BARD IS-4583-13), the Israel Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development Chief Scientist Office (847-0389-14), U.S. National Institutes for Health (AI109761), USAID PREDICT, and a fellowship to J.E.K.T. from the Manna Center Program in Food Safety and Security at Tel Aviv University. The authors declare no conflicts.

CTSA 2016 Priority – Tilapia Farming Development

Tilapia has been identified as one of the most desired species for aquaculture farming throughout the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA) region. Although most farming technology is available, the development and expansion of tilapia farming still faces regional challenges. One of the highest priorities in recent years has been stock improvement, and much work has been done in that area. CTSA encourages studies to continue improving the productivity of tilapia farming, and has identified the following top priorities for FY2016:

1) Develop protocols to ensure the quality of the final products.

2) Improve regional access to disease-free tilapia with high-quality genetic traits.

Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture
41-202 Kalaniana’ole Highway
Waimanalo, HI 96795

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