Category Archives: Breeding & Hatcheries

Availability Of Three-, Four-Star BAP Tilapia From China To Increase

Maoming City Maonan Sangao Fine Breeding Base, one of China’s largest tilapia hatcheries, has attained Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification.

The hatchery’s certification will likely increase the availability of three- and four-star BAP tilapia from China. Groups are capable of offering four-star BAP product if the product originates from BAP-certified hatcheries, feed mills, farms and processing plants. It’s the highest designation in the BAP third-party certification program.

The Fishin’ Company, one of the world’s largest tilapia importers, sponsored Maoming City Maonan Sangao Fine Breeding Base to apply for BAP certification. With the hatchery’s certification, the U.S.-based company will be capable of offering four-star BAP tilapia, as it sources fingerlings from the hatchery.

About BAP
A division of the Global Aquaculture Alliance, Best Aquaculture Practices is an international certification program based on achievable, science-based and continuously improved performance standards for the entire aquaculture supply chain — farms, hatcheries, processing plants and feed mills — that assure healthful foods produced through environmentally and socially responsible means. BAP certification is based on independent audits that evaluate compliance with the BAP standards developed by the Global Aquaculture Alliance.

Does selection in a challenging environment produce Nile tilapia genotypes that can thrive in a range of production systems?

Authors: Ngo Phu Thoa, Nguyen Huu Ninh, Wayne Knibb & Nguyen Hong Nguyen

Abstract

This study assessed whether selection for high growth in a challenging environment of medium salinity produces tilapia genotypes that perform well across different production environments. We estimated the genetic correlations between trait expressions in saline and freshwater using a strain of Nile tilapia selected for fast growth under salinity water of 15–20 ppt. We also estimated the heritability and genetic correlations for new traits of commercial importance (sexual maturity, feed conversion ratio, deformity and gill condition) in a full pedigree comprising 36,145 fish. The genetic correlations for the novel characters between the two environments were 0.78–0.99, suggesting that the effect of genotype by environment interaction was not biologically important. Across the environments, the heritability for body weight was moderate to high (0.32–0.62), indicating that this population will continue responding to future selection. The estimates of heritability for sexual maturity and survival were low but significant. The additive genetic components also exist for FCR, gill condition and deformity. Genetic correlations of harvest body weight with sexual maturity were positive and those between harvest body weight with FCR were negative. Our results indicate that the genetic line selected under a moderate saline water environment can be cultured successfully in freshwater systems.

See full article

Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 21486 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep21486

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

 

Philippines BFAR releases 300,000 tilapia fingerlings for Abra fisherfolk

BANGUED, Abra, Jan. 19(PIA)- – The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) regional office  released this month a total of 300,000 tilapia fingerlings  to  the province.

According to Provincial Fishery Officer Mr. Jesus Astrero, these fingerlings are distributed to fish folks and fish pond owners in the municipalities of Lagangilang, Sallapadan, Peñarrubia, Lagayan, Bucay, Pilar, Bangued, Dolores, San Juan, Tubo and Tayum.

“Other tilapia fingerlings will be placed in communal body of water or rivers while fingerlings left in the office will be dispersed in Calaba River,” he said.

These fingerlings are expected to grow in number to help the community have additional source of living.

The first stock of fingerlings from BFAR was requested by Governor Eustaquio P. Bersamin to augment the loss resulting from strong typhoons that struck the province last year. (JDP/GBB- PIA CAR, Abra)

MSD Animal Health Holds High Quality Tilapia Meeting at 2015 Tilapia Congress

Topics Include Disease Trends in Asia, Sustainable Production and Health Management

MADISON, NEW JERSEY, March 26, 2015 – Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada) today announced a High Quality Tilapia Meeting to be held on April 4 during the Tilapia 2015 Congress, the 4th International Trade and Technical Conference and Exposition on Tilapia. Merck Animal Health is a Platinum Sponsor of the Congress, which will take place at the Palace of the Golden Horses hotel in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from April 2-4.

“As demand for fish protein continues to rise, fish farmers need solutions that can help them ensure consistent and sustainable harvests,” said Norman Lim, Regional Technical Manager for Aquaculture in Asia. “Merck Animal Health has pioneered the development of tilapia vaccines in Asia, and we are pleased to expand our support through the High Quality Tilapia Meeting, to help fish farmers increase their productivity by taking an integrated approach to health management.”

The High Quality Tilapia Meeting will feature sessions led by industry experts and Merck Animal Health representatives on a variety of topics related to tilapia production, including disease trends in Asia, the role of diagnostics and genetics, and the benefits of an integrated approach to health management. Sessions and speakers include:

  • Session Introduction – Chris Haacke, Merck Animal Health
  • Tilapia Disease Trends in Asia – Dr. Chang Siow Foong, Merck Animal Health, R&D Site Lead, Singapore
  • The Importance of Diagnostics in the Health Management Process – Dr. Diana Chee, Aquatic Veterinarian, Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority, Singapore
  • The Role of Genetics in Animal Health and its Contribution to Sustainable Production – Dr. Jim McKay, Group Director, Science and Technology, Aviagen UK (EW Group)
  • Quality Healthy Fingerlings – Dr. Prakan Chiarahkhongman , CPF (Thailand)
  • Nutrition and Health Management – Dr. Minh Anh Pham, Aqua R&D Manager, InVivo NSA
  • Integrated Approach to Tilapia Health Management – Norman Lim, Merck Animal Health
  • Certification and Implications for Health Management – Michiel Fransen, Standards and Certification Coordinator, Aquaculture Stewardship Council

The introduction of vaccination in aquaculture has led to high levels of sustainability, productivity and improved performance in many major fish farming industries around the world. This approach to disease prevention has also allowed for investment in more efficient production methods and better feed utilization and formulations, driving sustainable production growth.

For more information about the High Quality Tilapia meeting, visit: http://highqualitycongress.com/# . To register for the Tilapia 2015 Congress, visit http://infofish.org/tilapia2015/index.php/programme .

Supporting Aquaculture in Asia and Beyond
In January 2000, Merck Animal Health opened a Research and Development Center in Singapore to develop high-quality aquaculture animal health products and application strategies for warm water fish-farming in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. In July 2012, Merck Animal Health obtained approval from Indonesian authorities to market the first vaccine for tilapia, AQUAVAC® Strep Sa for managing streptococcosis, a prevalent bacterial disease that can cause high levels of mortality and sharp decreases in fish performance. The availability of the tilapia vaccine continues to expand through product registrations in key tilapia-producing regions around the world. The company also runs a comprehensive technical and educational program known as ‘Strep Control Your Tilapia Health’ to support the implementation of vaccination programs and integrated health management on tilapia farms.

For more information about Merck Animal Health’s aquaculture business, visit http://aqua.merck-animal-health.com .

Tilapia Farming in Egypt

A 2014 report on aquaculture in Egypt presents some interesting information:

  • Despite the pressure on water, Egypt has the largest aquaculture industry in Africa with a market value of over $1.3 billion.
  • The industry now provides 65% of the country’s fish needs, with virtually all the output coming from small and medium-scale privately owned farms.
  • The main farmed fish is Nile tilapia and Egypt is the world’s second largest producer of farmed tilapia after China. Grey mullet and carp are also farmed, sometimes in mixed ponds with tilapia.
  • From small levels of production in the early 1990s fish farming has expanded rapidly while capture fishing has remained fairly constant, even declining somewhat after peaking at the beginning of the 21st century.
  • Aquaculture is also important in providing employment to an estimated 100,000 people of whom 50% are youth.
  • With the exception of Fayoum, aquaculture takes place in the Nile Delta region and mainly around the Northern Lakes area.

Citation: Mur, R. 2014. Development of the aquaculture value chain in Egypt: Report of the National Innovation Platform Workshop, Cairo, 19-20 February 2014. Cairo: WorldFish.

An Industry Assessment of Tilapia Farming in Egypt
Prepared by:
Dr. Adel A. Shaheen, B.V.Sc., M.V.Sc., Ph.D.
Professor of fish diseases & management Head Department of fish diseases & management
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Benha University Moshtohor – Toukh – Egypt

2.5. Status of fish production in Egypt

Capture fisheries in Egypt are in decline due to; overfishing, pollution, illegal, unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU), relaxation in the implementation of laws and regulations, lack of interest in clearing Straits and waterways, poor sustainable management of fisheries and aquaculture, illegal fishing operations of fry. In addition to the building of Aswan High Dam (that reduced the annual flood cycle of the Nile), the application of partial pond flushing, aeration and sex reversal are the major steps that contributed to the expansion,
intensification and growth of total tilapia production in ponds in Egypt.

The General Authority for Fish Resources Development (GAFRD) planned two-sided strategy aims to increase the productivity of freshwater aquaculture operations, while encouraging investment in marine aquaculture.

Finding more fish, between Egypt and Vietnam

A cooperation agreement between Egypt’s General Authority for Fish Resources Development (GAFRD) and Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) inked in May sets a framework for joint fisheries development. The protocol encourages researchers, trainers and quality control technicians in the two countries to share data, and calls for exchange visits of fisheries and aquaculture officials

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