Category Archives: Tilapia Culture – Worldwide

Major Tilapia Markets Continue to Weaken

International trade stays positive with promising African markets

The weak positions of the USA and EU, the major tilapia markets, continue into the first quarter of 2016. Nevertheless, international trade remained positive. Based on reporting by major markets and producers, total global tilapia exports are estimated to have increased by 18% during the first quarter of 2016, while imports are estimated to have grown by 15% compared with the same period in 2015. In addition to Asia and Latin America, which continue to produce and consume a growing amount of tilapia, African markets are increasingly taking a larger share of exports. Tilapia farming is also proving to play an important role in food security of countries in the Pacific, such as Fiji and Papua New Guinea.


Total exports of Chinese frozen tilapia experienced a year-on-year 3% decline in volume during the first quarter of 2016 mainly due to lower exports of frozen fillets (-13%). However, exports of breaded fillets and whole frozen tilapia were up by 9.8% and 2.4% respectively.

In terms of prices, average export prices of frozen tilapia in 2016 weakened further for all product groups. Export prices of frozen fillets were down 14.4% to USD 3.6 per kg, whole frozen by 6.5% to USD 2.04 per kg and breaded fillets by 11.8% to USD 3.86 per kg.

The USA remains the main market for Chinese frozen tilapia. In a new development however, Côte d’Ivoire overtook the USA as the largest Chinese market for whole frozen tilapia by importing 6 425 tonnes from China during the first quarter of 2016. This was an enormous 307% increase from the same period in 2015. Other African markets experiencing growth in Chinese whole frozen tilapia include Ghana, Kenya and Tanzania. Although average export prices to these African markets declined during the period under review, these markets paid higher prices (USD 2.20-2.60 per kg) compared with the US market (USD 1.79 per kg) due to strong demand, higher import tariffs and more nascent trade ties. It is important to note that imported tilapia represents a challenge for the development of domestic tilapia aquaculture in Africa.

For frozen fillets, which make up 40% of Chinese tilapia trade, exports declined to most markets including the USA. Notably, there was positive growth in exports to Iran, which indicates its potential as a growing market for tilapia fillets. Chinese exports of frozen fillets to Iran reached 3 600 tonnes during the 2016 first quarter, 59% up from the same period in 2015. The market has turned to tilapia as a cheaper source of frozen fish fillets compared with the popular New Zealand hoki.

In contrast, Chinese exports of frozen breaded tilapia experienced positive growth (+9.8%) into the main markets of Mexico, Côte d’Ivoire, Congo and Kenya.


Total tilapia imports into the US market during the first quarter of 2016 were 14% lower in terms of volume and 24% less in value terms compared with the same period of last year. 61 400 tonnes were shipped into the country valued at USD 247 976 million.

During the first three months of the year, China as usual remained the main tilapia supplier to the USA with 46 700 tonnes imported worth USD 166 838 million. These figures demonstrate a year-on-year decrease of 17% in volume and 29% value. The product mainly imported was frozen.
Other important suppliers, such as Honduras, Indonesia, Costa Rica and Mexico also registered drops in shipments to the USA, while Colombian exports of tilapia during January-March 2016 rose by 11.6% volume wise and 10% value wise.

Colombia’s interest in the US market was demonstrated during the Seafood Expo North America 2016 in Boston where 14 Colombian companies participated. The potential growth of Colombia as a tilapia supplier to the US market is largely driven by the Free Trade Agreement signed three years ago. Colombia is also targeting other potential markets such as Chile, Spain, France, the UK, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and Poland.
For now, Honduras maintains its leadership in the Latin American region as the largest exporter of fresh tilapia to the USA, despite the drop in production volume as a result of the drought caused by El Niño.


The weak demand in the EU persisted during the first quarter of 2016 as the EU imported 15.9% less total frozen tilapia compared with the same period in 2015. In total, the EU imported 6 600 tonnes of tilapia during this period. Both categories of frozen fillets and whole frozen tilapia, which take up almost equal shares, experienced declines of 7.3% and 26.4% respectively. Within the EU, Spain imports the largest volume of tilapia, mostly fillets although like elsewhere in the EU, imports declined during the review period.

Asia remains the main supply source to the EU, with the top five suppliers being China, Viet Nam, Indonesia, Thailand and Taiwan Province of China making up nearly 99% of the total. Frozen tilapia fillets from Taiwan Province of China fetch premium prices due to high quality. In the whole frozen category, imports increased from Bangladesh, with this tilapia primarily consumed by the ethnic population of Bangladeshi residents in the EU.

Taiwan Province of China
In the first quarter of 2016, total exports of frozen tilapia from Taiwan Province of China experienced 18% growth compared with the same period in 2015 to total 6 000 tonnes. The whole frozen tilapia makes up 90% of total frozen tilapia exports, with the first quarter showing 20% growth in this product category for exports to the major markets, namely the USA and the Middle East. Together, the US and Middle Eastern markets took an 88% market share of whole frozen tilapia exports from Taiwan Province of China. In contrast, frozen tilapia fillet exports experienced a marginal decline (-0.48%). Main markets for this product category are the USA, Republic of Korea, Canada and Japan.

Despite weakening in the major markets, the outlook seems promising amidst production problems in China as demand continues to be strong in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The species is also growing in importance for food security in the Pacific and the some parts of West Asia.

Source: FAO

The report analyses the tilapia market situation over the period January-June 2016 

CTSA 2016 Priority – Tilapia Farming Development

Tilapia has been identified as one of the most desired species for aquaculture farming throughout the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA) region. Although most farming technology is available, the development and expansion of tilapia farming still faces regional challenges. One of the highest priorities in recent years has been stock improvement, and much work has been done in that area. CTSA encourages studies to continue improving the productivity of tilapia farming, and has identified the following top priorities for FY2016:

1) Develop protocols to ensure the quality of the final products.

2) Improve regional access to disease-free tilapia with high-quality genetic traits.

Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture
41-202 Kalaniana’ole Highway
Waimanalo, HI 96795

Additional Resources:

First Latin American Company To Offer Four-Star BAP Tilapia

Paraiso Springs Aquaculture Guatemala is Latin America’s first company qualified to offer four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) tilapia, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in early March.

The company became eligible to offer four-star BAP tilapia with the BAP certification of its hatchery. Its new processing plant and farm — located in Caserio Los Angeles, San Luis Peten, Guatemala — are already BAP certified, as are the feed mills from which it sources feed, Areca Feed Mill in Guatemala and Cargill de Honduras.

Four-star BAP status denotes that the product originates from a BAP-certified processing plant, farm, hatchery and feed mill. It’s the highest achievement in the BAP program.

“We are very proud of the hard work our crew put forth to obtain BAP four-star certification. It certainly is an accomplishment for a small family-run operation like Paraiso Springs. This is a big part of our quality commitment to our clients and community,” said Alejandro Palomo, president of Paraiso Springs Aquaculture Guatemala.

Currently, worldwide, there are 74 BAP-certified tilapia processing plants and 68 BAP-certified tilapia farms, representing more than 175,000 metric tons annually.

About BAP
A division of the Global Aquaculture Alliance, Best Aquaculture Practices is an international certification program based on achievable, science-based and continuously improved performance standards for the entire aquaculture supply chain — farms, hatcheries, processing plants and feed mills — that assure healthful foods produced through environmentally and socially responsible means. BAP certification is based on independent audits that evaluate compliance with the BAP standards developed by the Global Aquaculture Alliance.

Aquaculture Symposium to Focus on Infectious Diseases of Tilapia & Strip Catfish

Aquaculture Symposium taking place on 24 of March all day at Meeting Room 2 (3rd floor) of SECC in Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam which focus on Infectious diseases of Tilapia & Strip catfish invite 4 Fisheries experts from Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand and the specialist in Tilapia from Vietnam to join the session.

The interesting topics are Franciscellosis, Streptococcosis, Columnaris disease in Tilapia and Strip catfish and Concurrent infection & Miscellaneous diseases, Antibiotic resistance in Aquaculture, Vaccine for Tilapia and Strip catfish and close session with Viral Nervous necrosis in Tilapia. This class is special for fish farmer to understand and study how to solve the infectious diseases of Tilapia and strip catfish in Vietnam. FAVA believe that this class will create the valuable knowledge for all delegate and the 120 seats are limited.

All conference program, please visit here

For more information of ILDEX Vietnam 2016, please visit

Feed experiment to increase nutritional value of tilapia

1 February 2016 – WorldFish scientists will begin to experiment with feed ingredients that can increase the nutritional value of tilapia as part of a new project.

AquaLINC, funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), aims to increase supplies of fish that are more affordable and have a higher nutritional content for consumers in Egypt and Bangladesh. Implemented by WorldFish, the project will focus on developing production models for tilapia that meet the demands of resource poor consumers and are profitable for producers and retailers.

Using feed-additives to increase the Omega 3, and micronutrient content of farmed fish will have significant benefits for all, but especially for resource poor consumers who are more likely to be under nourished.

Recent WorldFish research in Egypt and Bangladesh suggests poor consumers typically prefer purchasing less expensive, smaller fish while aquaculture production systems in both countries are increasingly geared towards producing larger fish. Focusing on a popular farmed fish, tilapia, AquaLINC will examine the business case for how to increase the production and market for smaller fish.

Smaller fish which consume less feed and have shorter lifecycles may reduce the environmental footprint for fish production, another research area for the project.

Nigel Preston, Director General, WorldFish: “We are committed to innovations that will promote pro-poor fish value chains. Increased consumption of fish in nutritionally insecure parts of the world will improve food and nutrition security.”

AquaLINC will establish enabling conditions for the development and expansion of pro-poor tilapia value chains in Bangladesh and Egypt by testing the economic and technical feasibility of producing more nutrient-rich and smaller-sized fish and its acceptance by poor consumers. These innovations are expected to lead to: improved quality of fish; increased consumption of fish by the poor, particularly for nutritionally vulnerable populations (women of reproductive age and young children); and lower environmental impacts in fish production.

The three-year project will build on current research on the nutrition and health benefits of fish. It will also add to the research on increasing the affordability of fish for poor consumers and a growing body of work on the environmental impact of farmed fish production.

For more information or to request an interview contact:

Toby Johnson, Senior Media Relations Manager
Mobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606

Philippines BFAR releases 300,000 tilapia fingerlings for Abra fisherfolk

BANGUED, Abra, Jan. 19(PIA)- – The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) regional office  released this month a total of 300,000 tilapia fingerlings  to  the province.

According to Provincial Fishery Officer Mr. Jesus Astrero, these fingerlings are distributed to fish folks and fish pond owners in the municipalities of Lagangilang, Sallapadan, Peñarrubia, Lagayan, Bucay, Pilar, Bangued, Dolores, San Juan, Tubo and Tayum.

“Other tilapia fingerlings will be placed in communal body of water or rivers while fingerlings left in the office will be dispersed in Calaba River,” he said.

These fingerlings are expected to grow in number to help the community have additional source of living.

The first stock of fingerlings from BFAR was requested by Governor Eustaquio P. Bersamin to augment the loss resulting from strong typhoons that struck the province last year. (JDP/GBB- PIA CAR, Abra)

Safety Concerns & Healthier Eating Trends Driving Change and Opportunity for U.S. Seafood Producers

Homebred Tilapia producers are best positioning themselves for the paradigm shift already under way

BONITA, CA – December 23, 2015 —  Few realize it, but the United States’ seafood market is worth a whopping $60 billion, mostly shrimp. Even more amazing, most consumed seafood in the U.S. is imported. This is good news for New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS:  NGEY), who seeks to close the loop on fully sustainable fish farming that’s safe and healthy for Americans.

With greater oversight and greater scrutiny of the seafood industry falling into place, however, United States consumers are understandably hesitant to consume more fish. Not only is the quality of this foreign seafood being increasingly questioned, safety concerns are now the norm.

Perhaps no other sliver of the seafood market has been held back by quality and safety concerns as much as tilapia has. That concern is creating opportunity for American providers, however, which can verify and validate their fish, is not only of the highest quality, but meets the highest safety standards.

It’s this aspect of the maturing U.S. tilapia market  in fact, the SmallCap Network research staff believes could provide a potentially compelling opportunity for investors in 2016.

In spite of the country’s capable seafood production business, more than 90% of the seafood eaten in the United States is imported. Tilapia is no exception. The majority of the tilapia eaten in the U.S. comes from China, Indonesia, Ecuador, and Honduras, just to name a few. Not all of these countries necessarily have the same safety and quality standards the U.S. may have. And, perhaps worse, even where standards are strong, the enforcement of those standards may or may not be consistent.

As an illustration of the concern, a 2009 report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, noted that over the course of the eight prior years, a great deal of the tilapia imported from China had been banned from being shipped to the U.S. because those “fish are often raised in ponds where they feed on waste from poultry and livestock.”

Of course, even where farm-raised tilapia isn’t consuming waste, mercury consumption is an ongoing and valid concern.

It’s not to say all Chinese fish farms are guilty of breeding tilapia in conditions that make them unsafe for consumption, and to the country’s credit, enforcement of minimal standards is improving. But, with 200 million small, independent aquafarms of less than two acres per farm coupled with the fact that China produces a whopping 40% of the world’s tilapia supply, regulatory oversight is still tenuous at best.

It’s unfortunate tilapia’s reputation has been damaged too, as it’s a particularly good source of protein. Aside from being a source of omega-3 fatty acids (which are important for brain function), one serving of tilapia can provide half the daily recommended amount of protein intake.

It’s this convergence of growing demand for tilapia and fear of consuming it that has presented an opportunity for U.S.-based providers, who can breed the fish safely and effectively, and in a venue that’s easy for consumers and regulators to verify is safe and clean.

Individual companies like New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS: NGEY) are quietly working to lead the charge.

Those who know New Global Energy well likely know it as a Moringa farm. Moringa is the world’s newest superfood, rich in nutrients and full of antioxidants. However, the Company’s entry into the Moringa business was actually fueled by New Global’ s aim to grow its own fish feed, so it would know exactly what its tilapia were consuming.

New Global Energy, through its subsidiary Aqua Farming Tech, has also gone to great lengths as well as expense, to ensure the water it breeds its fish in is properly filtered, safe, and clean.  This new found process of full sustainability is receiving rapid growth adoption across many industries.

The bulk of New Global Energy’s aqua farming growth plans are in front of it. As was recently noted in seafood industry publication Undercurrent News, the company aims to produce 27,500 pounds of tilapia per week by the first quarter of 2017, and the potential addition of a third and possibly even a fourth fish farm could ramp up that level of output. That translates into a few million in annual tilapia sales, making NGEY a potentially exciting prospect for investors.

First Chinese Tilapia Farms Earn ASC Certification

Qingdao, 3 November 2015 – Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co Ltd have become the first Chinese farms to achieve Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification. This landmark achievement reflects the pioneering initiative and efforts of a few farms in the industry to tackle some of the major challenges facing tilapia farming in China.

The success of the farms and their respective processers Hainan Xiangtai Fisheries Co., Ltd and Hainan Sky-Blue Ocean Foods Co., Ltd was celebrated today during the Sustainable Seafood Forum in Qingdao. The formal handover of the certificates was conducted by the  independent certification body that assessed the farms against the ASC standard, Intertek. The ceremony was attended by government officials, seafood industry representatives, NGOs and the media.


Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd are the first among a number of farms that undertook pre-assessments with help from WWF China to see if they operated in a way that meets the ASC Tilapia Standard. A third tilapia farm, Wenchang Zhou Qinfu, has been assessed against the ASC standard and hopes to be certified soon.

Achieving ASC certification brings global recognition that Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd are operating in a responsible way. It marks the start of their contribution towards a global market for responsibly produced seafood.

Mr Yang Huaying, Deputy Executive Director Hainan Sky-Blue Ocean Foods Co. Ltd said: “We are pleased that Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest has passed the assessment against the ASC Tilapia Standard. ASC certification allows us to prove to our customers that we are committed to responsible aquaculture.”

Mr Liu Rongjie, President Xiangtai Fisheries Co. Ltd, said: “For us it is important be able to show through a third party that our ambitions towards responsible tilapia farming have been achieved. The ASC certification of Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd helps us communicate this to our stakeholders.”

Making progress towards a more environmentally sustainable and socially responsible tilapia sector in the Chinese aquaculture industry has been achieved through a partnership between ASC, the China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA) and WWF China. As a result the industry has begun to make real strides in improving the transparency of Chinese tilapia aquaculture.

Dr Cui He, Executive Vice President, CAPPMA, said: “I would like to congratulate the Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd for becoming the first tilapia farms in China to meet the rigorous requirements of the ASC Tilapia Standard. CAPPMA has been diligently working with ASC and WWF China to promote responsible aquaculture in China. This is a major step towards responsible aquaculture in this important market.”

Credible and independent farm certification

ASC does not audit or certify farms itself; this is done by independent certifiers. The certifiers  have to undergo a rigorous process of accreditation by a company that is independent of ASC, Accreditation Services International (ASI). ASI also monitors the performance of accredited certifiers. Before certifiers can formally undertake audits their staff must have participated in an ASC Auditor Training course and passed the mandatory exam to demonstrate their full understanding of and competence in the application of the standard.

Chris Ninnes, ASC’s CEO, said: “These certifications reflect the substantial efforts of the farms to make real improvements in their operations. The farms were subject to scrutiny by a team of independent experts, which assessed them against the strict requirements of the ASC Tilapia Standard. This is a major milestone and they should be immensely proud of their achievements.”Throughout the assessment process stakeholders had the opportunity to input into the farm audits, with their views actively sought. This is a unique feature of the ASC programme.

The ASC Tilapia Standard development

Jin Zhonghao, Director of Market Transformation, WWF China, said: “The ASC standard for tilapia aquaculture was created by a series of open roundtable discussions coordinated by the WWF. The multi-stakeholder initiative involved more than 200 tilapia farming experts including producers, conservationists and scientists. The resulting standard is incredibly robust, built on scientific knowledge and practices aimed at addressing the key negative environmental and social impacts of the industry.”

By meeting the ASC Tilapia Standard the Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest Tilapia Farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd have demonstrated that they are well managed and minimise any adverse environmental or social impacts by, for example, focusing on the conservation and quality of water resources, no misuse of antibiotics, minimising escapes, compliance with strict feed requirements and meeting a range of social requirements.

Contact: Sun Brage
Aquaculture Stewardship Council
T: +31 (0)30 230 56 92

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC):

China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA):

World Wide Fund for Nature-China (WWF-China):

Tilapia Saint Peter’s Fish – The Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes – Occurred Again Today

TIBERIUS, Israel, June 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

Israel Snir, who is recognized as the pioneer of the Tilapia aquaculture and processing industry in Israel and worldwide, paid a special visit today to the Church of the “loaves and fishes” in Tabgha (Church of the Multiplication on The Banks of the Sea of Galilee) to strengthen the hands of the local people. Snir brought a large consignment of fish and loaves to the grateful clergy.


Tilapia Saint Peter’s Fish – The Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes

Snir said: “The move is meant to show solidarity with the pain of the church, in alignment with the preservation of this special place, and as a moral duty to express our opposition to the recent expressions of hatred and violence towards the church – and ask for forgiveness, though we have no direct involvement.

“I came as an individual, not on behalf of any organization but my conscience. I want to atone for the vandalism and to express the disgust and insult to the basic values ​​of all human society, with hopes to repair the damage to the reputation of Aquaculture in Israel, and to minimize further damage to the tourism industry and the degradation to Israel’s world image.”

After meeting the leaders of the church, Snir said: “Aggressive and violent, extremist fanatics hit Christian neighbors’ sacred site in an attempt to destroy a subtle but long-standing relationship based on mutual respect for human dignity – whatever our faith may be. They struck the church and its property – but not its spirit, they attempted to break the common faith that allowed for the harmonious life we have shared.”

Snir offered condolences, gratitude and sympathy with the pain of the church. “In recognition with the preservation of this miraculous place, we feel a moral obligation to say clearly that we are opposed to any expressions of hatred and violence towards you – and we ask for your forgiveness. We have come to revive the miracle again – we offer your church a symbolic gift of bread and fish!”

Israel is well known as the holy country due to its many places sacred to believers of Christianity, among them the Bread and Fish Church on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. But the church is much more than another holy site. Burning the church is a serious blow not only to the church but to many others all over the world for whom the story of the miracle of the loaves and fishes is a source of faith, inspiration, but first of all a source of life.

The miracle, in simple form, as recounted in the New Testament:

“But, lest we cause them to stumble, go thou to the sea, and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou hast opened his mouth, thou shalt find a shekel: that take, and give unto them for me and thee.” (Matthew 17:27)

Israel Snir, who was born on Kibbutz Neve Eitan of the Beit She’an Valley, a pioneer of the industry in the country, took the Tilapia, established a first in its class industrial processing factory named “Dag Shean” which lead the way to the first ever Tilapia fillet product to be introduced to the US and Europe and to the creation of one of the major seafood products produced and consumed today.

Over the last thirty years, the fish, known by names such as Ammon, Musht, Tilapia, Saint Peter’s Fish, has become the most important fish species globally, grown and locally consumed in more than 100 countries.

Israel Snir

SOURCE Ronen Hillel Communications

Indian Government Support to Aquaculture Industry Raising Aquafeed Demand

The Indian aquaculture industry is one of the most promising industries on global scale. As Indian Carps has gained tremendous popularity among different cuisines, government is taking initiatives to further elevate the demand of Indian aquacultured species. The subsidies and assistance provided by the government for development of aquaculture has been driving its growth in the industry. Both the Central and the State Government have undertaken several policy initiatives and measures to boost the growth of fisheries industry of India.

Various initiatives like Development of Freshwater Aquaculture, implemented by Fish Farmers Development Agencies (FFDAs), is an important scheme in inland sector. In order to boost inland fish production, assistance in the form of subsidy is given to the fish farmers for construction of new ponds, renovation of ponds and tanks, on first year inputs (fish seed, fertilizers, manures, etc.), integrated fish farming, running water fish culture, establishment of fish seed hatcheries and fish feed mills, etc. Hence, the fish farmers are motivated towards culturing the fishes and acquiring the above benefits, thus demanding more aquafeed. Also, based on the expected growth in the aquaculture industry in the country, the demand for aquafeed is bound to increase in the future.

The report “India Commercial Aquafeed Market Outlook 2018” provides an indepth and rational analysis of the commercial aquafeed market in India. It covers market forecast till 2018 for the production of major aquacultured finfishes like carps, tilapia and catfishes, along with aquacultured shellfish. Since the aquaculture production is expected to increase in the future, the production and consumption of commercial aquafeed is also bound to increase. Thus, the report also covers commercial aquafeed market forecast till 2018, which has been further fragmented into commercial finfish feed and commercial shrimp feed market.

The forecast for production and consumption of commercial finfish (i.e. carps, tilapia & catfish) feed have been drawn till 2018. A section about the major ingredients used in commercial finfish feed and their inclusion rate to generate a brief understanding of the kind of ingredients that will be in demand has also been provided in the report. Further, an overview of the drivers and the government initiatives, which have the capacity to put the industry on a growth trajectory, has also been given. We have also identified the challenges faced by the industry along with a brief overview of the FCR of various finfishes. The report also covers business overview of various well known industry players.

For FREE SAMPLE of this report visit: