Tag Archives: China

Availability Of Three-, Four-Star BAP Tilapia From China To Increase

Maoming City Maonan Sangao Fine Breeding Base, one of China’s largest tilapia hatcheries, has attained Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification.

The hatchery’s certification will likely increase the availability of three- and four-star BAP tilapia from China. Groups are capable of offering four-star BAP product if the product originates from BAP-certified hatcheries, feed mills, farms and processing plants. It’s the highest designation in the BAP third-party certification program.

The Fishin’ Company, one of the world’s largest tilapia importers, sponsored Maoming City Maonan Sangao Fine Breeding Base to apply for BAP certification. With the hatchery’s certification, the U.S.-based company will be capable of offering four-star BAP tilapia, as it sources fingerlings from the hatchery.

About BAP
A division of the Global Aquaculture Alliance, Best Aquaculture Practices is an international certification program based on achievable, science-based and continuously improved performance standards for the entire aquaculture supply chain — farms, hatcheries, processing plants and feed mills — that assure healthful foods produced through environmentally and socially responsible means. BAP certification is based on independent audits that evaluate compliance with the BAP standards developed by the Global Aquaculture Alliance.

Safety Concerns & Healthier Eating Trends Driving Change and Opportunity for U.S. Seafood Producers

Homebred Tilapia producers are best positioning themselves for the paradigm shift already under way

BONITA, CA – December 23, 2015 —  Few realize it, but the United States’ seafood market is worth a whopping $60 billion, mostly shrimp. Even more amazing, most consumed seafood in the U.S. is imported. This is good news for New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS:  NGEY), who seeks to close the loop on fully sustainable fish farming that’s safe and healthy for Americans.

With greater oversight and greater scrutiny of the seafood industry falling into place, however, United States consumers are understandably hesitant to consume more fish. Not only is the quality of this foreign seafood being increasingly questioned, safety concerns are now the norm.

Perhaps no other sliver of the seafood market has been held back by quality and safety concerns as much as tilapia has. That concern is creating opportunity for American providers, however, which can verify and validate their fish, is not only of the highest quality, but meets the highest safety standards.

It’s this aspect of the maturing U.S. tilapia market  in fact, the SmallCap Network research staff believes could provide a potentially compelling opportunity for investors in 2016.

In spite of the country’s capable seafood production business, more than 90% of the seafood eaten in the United States is imported. Tilapia is no exception. The majority of the tilapia eaten in the U.S. comes from China, Indonesia, Ecuador, and Honduras, just to name a few. Not all of these countries necessarily have the same safety and quality standards the U.S. may have. And, perhaps worse, even where standards are strong, the enforcement of those standards may or may not be consistent.

As an illustration of the concern, a 2009 report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, noted that over the course of the eight prior years, a great deal of the tilapia imported from China had been banned from being shipped to the U.S. because those “fish are often raised in ponds where they feed on waste from poultry and livestock.”

Of course, even where farm-raised tilapia isn’t consuming waste, mercury consumption is an ongoing and valid concern.

It’s not to say all Chinese fish farms are guilty of breeding tilapia in conditions that make them unsafe for consumption, and to the country’s credit, enforcement of minimal standards is improving. But, with 200 million small, independent aquafarms of less than two acres per farm coupled with the fact that China produces a whopping 40% of the world’s tilapia supply, regulatory oversight is still tenuous at best.

It’s unfortunate tilapia’s reputation has been damaged too, as it’s a particularly good source of protein. Aside from being a source of omega-3 fatty acids (which are important for brain function), one serving of tilapia can provide half the daily recommended amount of protein intake.

It’s this convergence of growing demand for tilapia and fear of consuming it that has presented an opportunity for U.S.-based providers, who can breed the fish safely and effectively, and in a venue that’s easy for consumers and regulators to verify is safe and clean.

Individual companies like New Global Energy Inc. (OTCMKTS: NGEY) are quietly working to lead the charge.

Those who know New Global Energy well likely know it as a Moringa farm. Moringa is the world’s newest superfood, rich in nutrients and full of antioxidants. However, the Company’s entry into the Moringa business was actually fueled by New Global’ s aim to grow its own fish feed, so it would know exactly what its tilapia were consuming.

New Global Energy, through its subsidiary Aqua Farming Tech, has also gone to great lengths as well as expense, to ensure the water it breeds its fish in is properly filtered, safe, and clean.  This new found process of full sustainability is receiving rapid growth adoption across many industries.

The bulk of New Global Energy’s aqua farming growth plans are in front of it. As was recently noted in seafood industry publication Undercurrent News, the company aims to produce 27,500 pounds of tilapia per week by the first quarter of 2017, and the potential addition of a third and possibly even a fourth fish farm could ramp up that level of output. That translates into a few million in annual tilapia sales, making NGEY a potentially exciting prospect for investors.

First Chinese Tilapia Farms Earn ASC Certification

Qingdao, 3 November 2015 – Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co Ltd have become the first Chinese farms to achieve Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification. This landmark achievement reflects the pioneering initiative and efforts of a few farms in the industry to tackle some of the major challenges facing tilapia farming in China.

The success of the farms and their respective processers Hainan Xiangtai Fisheries Co., Ltd and Hainan Sky-Blue Ocean Foods Co., Ltd was celebrated today during the Sustainable Seafood Forum in Qingdao. The formal handover of the certificates was conducted by the  independent certification body that assessed the farms against the ASC standard, Intertek. The ceremony was attended by government officials, seafood industry representatives, NGOs and the media.

chinese_asc

Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd are the first among a number of farms that undertook pre-assessments with help from WWF China to see if they operated in a way that meets the ASC Tilapia Standard. A third tilapia farm, Wenchang Zhou Qinfu, has been assessed against the ASC standard and hopes to be certified soon.

Achieving ASC certification brings global recognition that Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest tilapia farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd are operating in a responsible way. It marks the start of their contribution towards a global market for responsibly produced seafood.

Mr Yang Huaying, Deputy Executive Director Hainan Sky-Blue Ocean Foods Co. Ltd said: “We are pleased that Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest has passed the assessment against the ASC Tilapia Standard. ASC certification allows us to prove to our customers that we are committed to responsible aquaculture.”

Mr Liu Rongjie, President Xiangtai Fisheries Co. Ltd, said: “For us it is important be able to show through a third party that our ambitions towards responsible tilapia farming have been achieved. The ASC certification of Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd helps us communicate this to our stakeholders.”

Making progress towards a more environmentally sustainable and socially responsible tilapia sector in the Chinese aquaculture industry has been achieved through a partnership between ASC, the China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA) and WWF China. As a result the industry has begun to make real strides in improving the transparency of Chinese tilapia aquaculture.

Dr Cui He, Executive Vice President, CAPPMA, said: “I would like to congratulate the Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd for becoming the first tilapia farms in China to meet the rigorous requirements of the ASC Tilapia Standard. CAPPMA has been diligently working with ASC and WWF China to promote responsible aquaculture in China. This is a major step towards responsible aquaculture in this important market.”

Credible and independent farm certification

ASC does not audit or certify farms itself; this is done by independent certifiers. The certifiers  have to undergo a rigorous process of accreditation by a company that is independent of ASC, Accreditation Services International (ASI). ASI also monitors the performance of accredited certifiers. Before certifiers can formally undertake audits their staff must have participated in an ASC Auditor Training course and passed the mandatory exam to demonstrate their full understanding of and competence in the application of the standard.

Chris Ninnes, ASC’s CEO, said: “These certifications reflect the substantial efforts of the farms to make real improvements in their operations. The farms were subject to scrutiny by a team of independent experts, which assessed them against the strict requirements of the ASC Tilapia Standard. This is a major milestone and they should be immensely proud of their achievements.”Throughout the assessment process stakeholders had the opportunity to input into the farm audits, with their views actively sought. This is a unique feature of the ASC programme.

The ASC Tilapia Standard development

Jin Zhonghao, Director of Market Transformation, WWF China, said: “The ASC standard for tilapia aquaculture was created by a series of open roundtable discussions coordinated by the WWF. The multi-stakeholder initiative involved more than 200 tilapia farming experts including producers, conservationists and scientists. The resulting standard is incredibly robust, built on scientific knowledge and practices aimed at addressing the key negative environmental and social impacts of the industry.”

By meeting the ASC Tilapia Standard the Qionghai Zhongpingzi Grobest Tilapia Farm and Chengmai Xingyuan Development Co. Ltd have demonstrated that they are well managed and minimise any adverse environmental or social impacts by, for example, focusing on the conservation and quality of water resources, no misuse of antibiotics, minimising escapes, compliance with strict feed requirements and meeting a range of social requirements.

Contact: Sun Brage
Aquaculture Stewardship Council
Sun.Brage@asc-aqua.org
T: +31 (0)30 230 56 92

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC): www.asc-aqua.org

China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA): www.cappma.org

World Wide Fund for Nature-China (WWF-China): www.wwfchina.org

Tilapia: A Healthy Food Choice

Tilapia are hardy, fast growing, warm-water fish that are a popular choice for aquaculture. Tilapia are members of the Cichlid family that are native to freshwater in Africa and the Middle East. Tilapia production is booming worldwide, having increased from 1.6 metric tons in 1999 to 3.5 metric tons in 2008. China, Bangladesh, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand are the top five global producers of tilapia.

A decade ago, tilapia were relatively unknown in the United States, but they are gaining in popularity. Originally targeted for Asian and African ethnic populations, tilapia are now widely available to the general public in fish markets and supermarkets.

Tilapia is sold live, fresh, and frozen and in different product forms (whole, gutted, and fillets). Most tilapia consumed in in the U.S. is frozen product that comes from China and Taiwan. Central and South America are the prime source of imported fresh tilapia. Tilapia farming in the United States provides less than 10% of tilapia consumed domestically. In 2010 Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia, which ranks it as the number one consumed farmed fish in the U.S.

Because of their mild flavored, white-fleshed fillets, tilapia makes an ideal ingredient for many recipes. Tilapia are a good source of protein and a 3.5 oz. serving contains 28 grams of proteins. Tilapia is low in saturated fat, calories, carbohydrates and sodium. Tilapia also contains good amounts of other beneficial nutrients, including selenium, vitamin B12, niacin, phosphorous, and potassium.

Mercury is a toxic compound that is often concentrated in fish that are predators at the top of the food chain. Tilapia are oomnivorous and can eat many foods, including plants, animals, and algae. Due to their feeding habits, fast growth, and short lifespan, they contain very little mercury.

There is some concern about the cholesterol levels in tilapia. A 3.5 oz. serving of tilapia contains 57 mg of cholesterol, which is 19% of the daily recommended amount. Cholesterol is a naturally occurring steroid that is essential for maintaining body health. However, high levels of cholesterol, particularly “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL), can contribute to heart disease.

Many cold-water fish, such as salmon, trout, herring, and mackerel, contain high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. High levels of omega-3s contribute to healthy heart maintenance and can help reduce cholesterol and blood pressure.

A study released by the Wake Forest University School of Medicine in 2008, found that farm-raised tilapia contain low levels of beneficial omega-3s (less than half a gram per 3.5 oz. of fish, similar to flounder and swordfish), but relatively high levels of omega-6s. The researchers indicated that this combination of fatty acids could cause a detrimental inflammation response in individuals with heart disease, arthritis, asthma and other allergic and auto-immune diseases.

In response to this study, an open letter from 16 science and health experts from around the world confirmed that tilapia can indeed be considered part of a healthy diet. They emphasized that tilapia are relatively low in total and saturated fats and high in protein and essential trace nutrients. Tilapia provide more omega-3s than other meat alternatives like hamburger, steak, chicken, pork or turkey.

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two times (two servings) a week. You can meet this requirement either by eating tilapia more often or in combination with other fatty fish, such as salmon and tuna. Given its nutritional benefits, tilapia is a good food choice for those interested in healthy eating.

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