Tag Archives: growth

Tilapia Farming in Egypt

A 2014 report on aquaculture in Egypt presents some interesting information:

  • Despite the pressure on water, Egypt has the largest aquaculture industry in Africa with a market value of over $1.3 billion.
  • The industry now provides 65% of the country’s fish needs, with virtually all the output coming from small and medium-scale privately owned farms.
  • The main farmed fish is Nile tilapia and Egypt is the world’s second largest producer of farmed tilapia after China. Grey mullet and carp are also farmed, sometimes in mixed ponds with tilapia.
  • From small levels of production in the early 1990s fish farming has expanded rapidly while capture fishing has remained fairly constant, even declining somewhat after peaking at the beginning of the 21st century.
  • Aquaculture is also important in providing employment to an estimated 100,000 people of whom 50% are youth.
  • With the exception of Fayoum, aquaculture takes place in the Nile Delta region and mainly around the Northern Lakes area.

Citation: Mur, R. 2014. Development of the aquaculture value chain in Egypt: Report of the National Innovation Platform Workshop, Cairo, 19-20 February 2014. Cairo: WorldFish.

An Industry Assessment of Tilapia Farming in Egypt
Prepared by:
Dr. Adel A. Shaheen, B.V.Sc., M.V.Sc., Ph.D.
Professor of fish diseases & management Head Department of fish diseases & management
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Benha University Moshtohor – Toukh – Egypt

2.5. Status of fish production in Egypt

Capture fisheries in Egypt are in decline due to; overfishing, pollution, illegal, unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU), relaxation in the implementation of laws and regulations, lack of interest in clearing Straits and waterways, poor sustainable management of fisheries and aquaculture, illegal fishing operations of fry. In addition to the building of Aswan High Dam (that reduced the annual flood cycle of the Nile), the application of partial pond flushing, aeration and sex reversal are the major steps that contributed to the expansion,
intensification and growth of total tilapia production in ponds in Egypt.

The General Authority for Fish Resources Development (GAFRD) planned two-sided strategy aims to increase the productivity of freshwater aquaculture operations, while encouraging investment in marine aquaculture.

Finding more fish, between Egypt and Vietnam

A cooperation agreement between Egypt’s General Authority for Fish Resources Development (GAFRD) and Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) inked in May sets a framework for joint fisheries development. The protocol encourages researchers, trainers and quality control technicians in the two countries to share data, and calls for exchange visits of fisheries and aquaculture officials

WorldFish Aquaculture Training Videos

 

Online aquaculture training videos now available to Egyptian fish farmers

A series of high quality aquaculture training videos, designed to teach Egyptian fish farmers the industry’s best management practices, has recently been released.

Produced by WorldFish, an international nonprofit research organization, the ten short videos are being used to train local fish farmers in the most effective ways to boost the production and quality of farmed fish.

Available in Arabic with English subtitles, the videos cover all aspects of aquaculture from pond preparation and fish health care, to how to transport and handle live fish.

“These videos are good learning tool for fish farmers to show them the industry’s best management practices in a simplified way”, says Dr. Diaa Al-Kenawy, Research Scientist at WorldFish.

“Both the trainers and the farmers found the videos very useful because they explain all fish farming stages from site selection and pond design to harvest and post-harvest treatment”, he adds.

The videos are part of the Improving Employment and Income through the Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector (IEIDEAS) project, which aims to strengthen and develop the country’s US$1.5 billion aquaculture industry and generate more employment in the sector.

The IEIDEAS project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish, which aims to increase the productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems in sustainable ways, making meat, milk and fish more available and affordable to poor consumers across the developing world.

Strengthening the aquaculture industry in Egypt will help to secure the livelihoods of over 100,000 men and women employed in the sector, and ensure an affordable source of animal protein for the millions of poor who depend on fish.

While the videos are targeted at Egyptian fish farmers, they offer industry tips that will benefit pond-based aquaculture producers around the world.

Watch the videos. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_5s5CPGqCKQtv15flpx4UKDltm3JyEIM

About WorldFish

WorldFish, a member of the CGIAR Consortium, is an international, nonprofit research organization committed to reducing poverty and hunger through fisheries and aquaculture.

About CGIAR

CGIAR is a global agriculture research partnership for a food secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research centers who are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partner organizations.

For more information or to request an interview please contact:

Diane Shohet, Director, Communications and Marketing, WorldFish

Tel: +6017 474 8606

Email: d.shohet@cgiar.org

Aquaponics Master Class – 3 Days

This is a comprehensive course covering all aspects of aquaponics and controlled environment agriculture. Our Aquaponics Master Class is intended for anyone seriously considering getting into aquaponic food production, or those already doing aquaponics who want to learn more about the technology. We cover the topics most important to being successful in aquaponics including aquaponic methods and applications, crop choices and recommendations, water quality, daily operation and growing techniques, greenhouses and environmental control, fish biology and feeds, plant care and health, system start up and business considerations.

In the Aquaponics Master Class, we don’t waste your time with fluff or with inexperienced instructors. We have developed a comprehensive and cohesive curriculum. We share the most important tips and techniques for growing and we show you the path to success in aquaponics, all based on our 20 years’ experience in aquaponic food production.

Morning sessions are held in a classroom. Presenations are interesting and dynamic. Attendee questions and participation is encouraged. Afternoon sessions are held in Nelson and Pade, Inc.’s demonstration greenhouse. Attendees get to practice hands on, what is taught. Activities include fish feeding, water quality testing, plant seeding and harvesting, and much more!

Nelson and Pade, Inc., in a partnership with the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point (UWSP), offers our Master Class attendees the opportunity to earn undergraduate and graduate credit through an accredited university, the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point. The credit is transferable to other colleges and Universities. Students do not need to be enrolled at UW-SP.

Details

Length: 3 days
Materials Included: Course Materials, Certificate of Participation, T-shirt, Goody Bag
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Snacks and refreshments
Cost: $995
Registration: Call us at 608-297-8708 or email info@aquaponics.com
Register Today! Online Registration
or Download and Print the 2013 Master Class Registration Form

Tilapia Foods and Feeding

Tilapia feed on a wide range of food which makes them a very favorable fish to grow. Juvenile tilapia are omnivorous, meaning that they are opportunistic feeders that ingest both plants and animals without specialization. Adult tilapia are primarily herbivorous (vegetarians).

Tilapia can be raised successfully using the natural food that is available in farm ponds and other water bodies. The nutritional material in farm ponds can be enhanced with the addition of manures. Organic fertilizers introduce detrital material and promote the growth of plankton and algae. These materials can be consumed by tilapia and provide nutrition for their growth. Rural farmers using organic fertilizers can grow tilapia fingerlings to marketable size in 6 months.

Tilapia diets show differences depending on their life stage. The table outlines some of the dietary differences between fry, fingerlings, and adults.

Fry – newly hatched tilapia, 0.25 to 0.75 inches long Detritus & Neuston (organisms   that float on the top of water)
Fingerlings (Juvenile) 0.75 to 1.5 inches long Detritus & Periphyton (a complex mixture of algae,   cyanobacteria, heterotrophic microbes, and detritus that are attached to   submerged surfaces in aquatic ecosystems)
Adults Algae, bacteria, detritus, duckweed, other plants

Because tilapia feed on food sources that are lower on the food chain, they do not have issues with mercury concentration like higher-level predatory fish, such as swordfish, pike, halibut, and albacore. Tilapia have the potential to be a highly sustainable food resource.

The table outlines some of the differences in dietary habits for popular farmed tilapia groups.

Nile tilapia Phytoplankton and detritus
Mozambique tilapia Vegetation and bottom algae
Blue tilapia Zooplankton and detritus

When raising tilapia in tanks or intensive recirculating systems, natural foods will need to be supplemented or replaced with formulated foods. Newly hatched fry require smaller food particles. They can be fed a specially formulated powder that can meet their nutritional requirements at this crucial stage of growth. Fingerlings can be fed larger, formulated foods that contain digestible proteins and fats to promote growth.

As tilapia increase in size, they can be feed a pelleted diet that contain key nutrients such as proteins (amino acids), fats, minerals, and vitamins. Tilapia raised in tanks cultures benefit from having a consistent diet compared to tilapia that depend on natural foods in native water bodies.

References

 

Tilapia Culture

An overview of tilapia culture by Leonard Lovshin, Auburn University. The presentation covers tilapia groups, origins, culture environments, feeding, reproduction, hybridization, grow-out, marketing, and global potential.