Tag Archives: regulations

Arizona Aquaculture Contacts

Agencies / Regulatory

Arizona Department of Agriculture
1688 W. Adams St
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Tel: (602) 542-4373
Website: agriculture.az.gov

Arizona Game and Fish Department
5000 W. Carefree Highway
Phoenix, AZ 85086-5000
Tel: (602) 942-3000
Website: www.azgfd.gov
Mission: To conserve Arizona’s diverse wildlife resources and manage for safe, compatible outdoor recreation opportunities for current and future generations.

Arizona Tilapia Culture

Rules and Regulations

January 4, 2016

Introduction: On December 5, 2015, five species of Tilapia and their hybrids were added to Arizona Game and Fish Commission Rules R12-4-406 (R12 [Natural Resources], Chapter 4 [Game and Fish Commission], Article 4 [Live Wildlife], 406 [Restricted Live Wildlife]). As restricted live wildlife, those species of Tilapia and their hybrids (Oreochromis aureus [Blue Tilapia or Israeli Tilapia], O. mossambica [Mozambique Tilapia]; O. niloticus [Nile Tilapia], O. urolepis hornorum [Wami Tilapia] and T. zillii [Redbelly Tilapia]) may only be imported, purchased, possessed, transported and stocked in Arizona through R12-4-410: Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License. The guidance below is applicable to the following: individuals who want to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock these species in Arizona; individuals who possessed the relevant Tilapia species prior to December 5, 2015; and individuals or businesses that want to sell the Tilapia species for the purposes of use in aquaculture or aquaponics.

I. Individuals who want to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock these species in Arizona as of December 5, 2015:

a. An Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License must be obtained from the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The license is free and is valid for no more than 20 consecutive days. Fish must be from a facility certified to be free of diseases and causative agents, and the certification must be submitted with the license application. https://azgfdportal.az.gov/license/speciallicense/aquaticstocking/

i. Disease free certification – Certification is based on a physical examination of the fish farm or pond of origin by a qualified fish health inspector or fish pathologist performed no more than 12 months before the fish are shipped to the Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License holder. Individuals or businesses pursuing certification can contact the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s Fish Pathologist, Joe Marcino, for more information jmarcino@azgfd.gov.

II. Individuals with the relevant Tilapia species used in backyard ponds, aquaponics, or for aquaculture that were in possession prior to December 5, 2015:

a. An Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License must be obtained from the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Disease free certification will be waived for the Tilapia currently in possession, but any future Tilapia that the individual wants to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock must obtain a new Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License. The license is free and is valid for no more than 20 consecutive days. Fish must be from a facility certified to be free of diseases and causative agents, and the certification must be submitted with the license application (see I[a][i] above).

III. Aquaculture License – An individual who wishes to sell, trade, display, purchase, export, possess, propagate, culture or rear live Tilapia for profit is required to obtain an aquaculture permit from the Arizona Department of Agriculture; this is not a new requirement. The permit application will require that information regarding the
location, water source and water disposal, the responsible (contact) person be provided. The application also must include the species being cultured ($100 per year). https://agriculture.az.gov/aquaculture-facility-license-application

IV. Transporter License – An individual who wishes to transport live fish to persons who are licensed to resell, possess, or stock live Tilapia in Arizona must have a transporter license from the Arizona Department of Agriculture; this is not a new requirement ($100 per year). https://agriculture.az.gov/aquaculture-transporter-license https://agriculture.az.gov/category-terms/aquaculture (for general information for licenses required for individuals or businesses that sell fish for profit in Arizona)

Ohio Tilapia Culture

While aquaculture is growing in Ohio, tilapia farms are still a minor contributor to the overall state fish production.Ohio Production

 

 

 

For more information, see Ohio Aquaculture Industry Analysis

Some Ohio tilapia farms:

Ripple Rock Fish Farms
6805 Old Stagecoach Road,
Frazeysburg, Ohio, 43822
740-828-2792

Sugar Creek Fishery
7799 Sugar Creek Rd
Lima, OH 45801
Phone:(330) 554-7151

Regulatory Issues in Ohio Regarding Aquaculture

By: Laura Tiu, Aquaculture Specialist, OSU South Centers

Aquaculture is a form of agriculture in Ohio.

Ohio Revised Code 1.61. “Agriculture” defined.

As used in any statute except section 303.01 or 519.01 of the Revised Code, “agriculture” includes farming; ranching; aquaculture; apiculture and related apicultural activities, production of honey, beeswax, honeycomb, and other related products; horticulture; viticulture, winemaking, and related activities; animal husbandry, including, but not limited to, the care and raising of livestock, equine, and fur-bearing animals; poultry husbandry and the production of poultry and poultry products; dairy production; the production of field crops, tobacco, fruits, vegetables, nursery stock, ornamental shrubs, ornamental trees, flowers, sod, or mushrooms; timber; pasturage; any combination of the foregoing; the processing, drying, storage, and marketing of agricultural products when those activities are conducted in conjunction with, but are secondary to, such husbandry or production; and any additions or modifications to the foregoing made by the director of agriculture by rule adopted in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code.

In a recent survey of State Aquaculture Coordinators, the 17 states that define aquaculture find it has a number of benefits:

  • sales and use tax exemptions
  • building code exemptions
  • right-to-farm laws developed to create a legal buffer between farms and encroaching suburbanites
  • allows for sovereign submerged land leases
  • protects farmers who follow BMPs from environmental lawsuits
  • provides for an ombudsman to resolve issues with regulatory agencies
  • disaster assistance from USDA
  • access to land, water appropriations, and discharge exemptions provided to agricultural operations
  • provides a seat on the state’s Agricultural Commission and representation by Farm Bureau
  • makes theft of farmed fish punishable
  • allows exemption from wildlife regulations on take method, season, limit, and size
  • allows producers to file for agricultural land tax rates
  • provides for coordinated fish health monitoring efforts

Aquaculture permits in Ohio.

Fee: $50.00 – $100.00

Ohio Revised Code 1533.632. Aquaculture permits in Ohio.

Permitting for production of aquaculture species is provided by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

http://ohiodnr.com/Home/fishing/fisheriesmanagement/fishingaquacultureaquaculture/tabid/6238/Default.aspx

The Aquaculture Law Digest is accessible on-line as ODNR Publication 61.

Permits are annual from January 1 – December 31.

Transportation and Baitfish permits information available on the same webpage.

Fish Importation into Ohio

Aquatic fish health is regulated by the Ohio Department of Agriculture

Find more information on this website: http://www.ncrac.org/Info/StateImportRegs/ohio.htm#Importation

Storm Water Discharge permits – Ohio EPA

Fee: $200.00 – $500.00

As of March 10, 2003, if your construction project disturbs 1 or more acres of ground, you must get a permit to discharge storm water from your site. If your project disturbs less than 1 acre but is part of a larger plan of development or sale, you also need a permit to discharge storm water from the site. This includes excavation of ponds.

For more information: http://www.epa.ohio.gov/dsw/storm/construction_index.aspx

NOI form: http://www.epa.ohio.gov/portals/35/documents/NOI_form2_fis.pdf

NOI costs: http://www.epa.ohio.gov/dsw/permits/gpfees.aspx

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit

Specific language from Federal Register 40 CFR part 451, Vol. 68, No

162 August 24, 2004:

On June 30, 2001, EPA finalized a new rule establishing regulations for concentrated aquatic animal production (CAAP), or farm raised fish facilities. The regulation will apply to approximately 245 facilities that generate wastewater from their operations and discharge that wastewater directly into waters of the United States. This rule will help reduce discharges of conventional pollutants, primarily total suspended solids. The rule will also help reduce non-conventional pollutants such as nutrients. To a lesser extent, the rule will reduce drugs that are used to manage diseased fish, chemicals used to clean net pens, and toxic pollutants (metals and PCBs). The final rule applies to direct discharges of wastewater from existing and new facilities that produce at least 100,000 pounds of fish a year and discharge at least 30 days a year and facilities that produce at least 100,000 pounds of fish a year in net pens or submerged cages.

Information: http://water.epa.gov/scitech/wastetech/guide/aquaculture/index.cfm

Form: http://www.epa.ohio.gov/portals/35/permits/cafo_fedrgstr_form2b.pdf

Water Withdrawal Facilities Registration

The Water Withdrawal Facilities Registration Program, as established in H.B. 662 by the Ohio General Assembly in 1988, implements one of the objectives of the Great Lakes Charter in Ohio. Section 1521.16 of the Ohio Revised code requires any owner of a facility, or combination of facilities, with the capacity to withdraw water at a quantity greater than 100,000 gallons per day (GPD) to register such facilities with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Water. The Water Withdrawal Facility Registration (WWFR) Program will provide information of great importance to the citizens of the state. Water, one of our most basic and precious natural resources, needs to be studied more intensely and water resource planners need reliable information to plan for the future. The state’s economy depends on water and economic development will continue to place increased demands on this critical resource.

Water withdrawal forms: http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/Water/wwfr/default/tabid/4265/Default.aspx

Fish Processing

Your aquaculture permit allows you to sell fish live or whole on ice. If you want to process your fish product, you fall under additional regulations.

On-farm retail: If it is 100% retail from the farm (no wholesaling), it does not fall under the federal or state seafood HACCP regulation, just the local health department.

Every “processor” must conduct a hazard analysis to determine whether they have likely food safety hazards that they must control. This processing falls under Federal HACCP regulations. For more information go to:

http://seafood.ucdavis.edu/

For HACCP questions in Ohio:

Diane R. McDaniel
Assistant to District Director
1600 Watermark Drive
Suite 105
Columbus, OH 43215
(614)487-1273 Ext 15
(614)487-9658 (fax)
diane.mcdaniel@fda.hhs.gov

Massachusetts Aquaculture Contacts

Agencies / Regulatory

Sean F. Bowen
Food Safety and Aquaculture Specialist
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources
251 Causeway Street, Suite 500
Boston, MA 02114
617-626-1724
sean.bowen@state.ma.us

Education and Extension

Bob Schrader
Associate Director, Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment
316 Stockbridge Hall
80 Campus Center Way
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003
phone: 413.545.0143
fax: 413.545.6555
schrader@cns.umass.edu

University of Massachusetts – Amherst

Southeastern Massachusetts Aquaculture Center (SEMAC)

Northeastern Massachusetts Aquaculture Center (NEMAC)

Affiliated Associations

Massachusetts Aquaculture Association
P.O. Box 500
North Eastham, MA 02651

Massachusetts Tilapia Culture

The Massachusetts aquaculture industry is a very diverse sector of the Commonwealth’s agriculture industry. Although the cultivation of aquatic species (specifically shellfish and crustaceans) was practiced by the Native Americans and later by the colonists on Cape Cod, it was not until the 1970s when more efficient cultivation techniques were developed that commercial cultivation activities began. Since that time aquaculture in Massachusetts has grown to include more than 15 species of fish and shellfish that are cultivated for food, research, biomedical, sport and ornamental purposes.

Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries reported that the Massachusetts shellfish aquaculture industry generated more than $6.2 million in 2006. At that time, there were more than 350 individuals and companies involved in aquaculture in Massachusetts with nearly 300 as marine shellfish culture enterprises growing primarily Quahogs (hard shell clam) and American oyster. The Commonwealth’s finfish growers produce a variety of species of finfish, including barramundi, tilapia, largemouth bass, black sea bass, brown bullhead, several species of trout, and several species of baitfish.

Although there are a number of institutions, organizations and government entities involved in the Bay State’s aquaculture industry, the primary trade group working for the industry is the Massachusetts Aquaculture Association. (Source: Mass.gov)

Tilapia Culture

There are a few farms growing tilapia in Massachusetts.

The Barr Family Farm (Rehoboth, MA) is an aquaponic farm where we raise tilapia and use the fish emulsion to fertilize our hydroponic greenhouse crops and field crops

E & T Farms, Inc. (W. Barnstable, MA) specializes in aquaponics. We raise fish and hydroponic vegetables, as well as produce our own honey. Please contact us for more information, or visit us during our retail hours Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday from 10:00-4:00.

UMASS student-run Aquaculture and Aquaponics

The UMass aquaculture system is being monitored and maintained by UMass students.Tilapia are being raised currently, and the plants being grown are a variety of edible leafy garden plants. The type of fish and plants that are part of the system are subject to change depending on student goals and interests.

Farming Tilapia

Tilapia are a freshwater finfish that have been farmed for thousands of years. Native to northern Africa they are a worm water species that have been raised by locals via small scale, low tech operations. They are a fast growing, large fish that are mainly primary consumers; Tilapia are an ideal species for aquaculture systems. Current educational projects in Uganda run by James Webb are focusing on inexpensive, energy efficient aquaculture systems that can be utilized to increase productivity of many systems that have already been established by local farmers.

Regulations

The predominant regulation governing freshwater aquaculture in Massachusetts is 321 CMR 4.09 (Artificial Propagation of Finfish), and can  be found at: http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/laws-regulations/cmr/321-cmr-400-fishing.html.

Culture of tilapia in MA requires a Type C fish species, accordingly, the permit required is a Class 3, Type C permit, issed by the Division of Fish and Wildlife.  This is required to be a closed/recirculated system, as is spelled out in the regulation.