Tag Archives: tilapia

Arizona Tilapia Culture

Rules and Regulations

January 4, 2016

Introduction: On December 5, 2015, five species of Tilapia and their hybrids were added to Arizona Game and Fish Commission Rules R12-4-406 (R12 [Natural Resources], Chapter 4 [Game and Fish Commission], Article 4 [Live Wildlife], 406 [Restricted Live Wildlife]). As restricted live wildlife, those species of Tilapia and their hybrids (Oreochromis aureus [Blue Tilapia or Israeli Tilapia], O. mossambica [Mozambique Tilapia]; O. niloticus [Nile Tilapia], O. urolepis hornorum [Wami Tilapia] and T. zillii [Redbelly Tilapia]) may only be imported, purchased, possessed, transported and stocked in Arizona through R12-4-410: Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License. The guidance below is applicable to the following: individuals who want to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock these species in Arizona; individuals who possessed the relevant Tilapia species prior to December 5, 2015; and individuals or businesses that want to sell the Tilapia species for the purposes of use in aquaculture or aquaponics.

I. Individuals who want to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock these species in Arizona as of December 5, 2015:

a. An Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License must be obtained from the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The license is free and is valid for no more than 20 consecutive days. Fish must be from a facility certified to be free of diseases and causative agents, and the certification must be submitted with the license application. https://azgfdportal.az.gov/license/speciallicense/aquaticstocking/

i. Disease free certification – Certification is based on a physical examination of the fish farm or pond of origin by a qualified fish health inspector or fish pathologist performed no more than 12 months before the fish are shipped to the Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License holder. Individuals or businesses pursuing certification can contact the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s Fish Pathologist, Joe Marcino, for more information jmarcino@azgfd.gov.

II. Individuals with the relevant Tilapia species used in backyard ponds, aquaponics, or for aquaculture that were in possession prior to December 5, 2015:

a. An Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License must be obtained from the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Disease free certification will be waived for the Tilapia currently in possession, but any future Tilapia that the individual wants to import, purchase, possess, transport, and/or stock must obtain a new Aquatic Wildlife Stocking License. The license is free and is valid for no more than 20 consecutive days. Fish must be from a facility certified to be free of diseases and causative agents, and the certification must be submitted with the license application (see I[a][i] above).

III. Aquaculture License – An individual who wishes to sell, trade, display, purchase, export, possess, propagate, culture or rear live Tilapia for profit is required to obtain an aquaculture permit from the Arizona Department of Agriculture; this is not a new requirement. The permit application will require that information regarding the
location, water source and water disposal, the responsible (contact) person be provided. The application also must include the species being cultured ($100 per year). https://agriculture.az.gov/aquaculture-facility-license-application

IV. Transporter License – An individual who wishes to transport live fish to persons who are licensed to resell, possess, or stock live Tilapia in Arizona must have a transporter license from the Arizona Department of Agriculture; this is not a new requirement ($100 per year). https://agriculture.az.gov/aquaculture-transporter-license https://agriculture.az.gov/category-terms/aquaculture (for general information for licenses required for individuals or businesses that sell fish for profit in Arizona)

New software tool from Evonik improves tilapia aquaculture

Evonik launches new service AMINOTilapia® for aquaculture

Genetics roadmap to develop more resilient farmed fish

WorldFish will embark on new research to create more resilient fish with characteristics such as disease resistance and more effective feed utilization. Based on a roadmap developed with world experts at a WorldFish-hosted fish breeding workshop on 23–24 May at The Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, the research will use advanced techniques such as genomic selection to introduce these characteristics into its improved tilapia strains.

Since 1988, WorldFish has used selective breeding to develop and manage the fast-growing Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain. The strain has been disseminated to at least 16 countries, mostly in the developing world, and is grown by millions of small-scale fish farmers for food, income and nutrition across the globe.

Harvested GIFT Tilapia (Credit: Worldfish)

Harvested GIFT Tilapia (Credit: Worldfish)

Use of genomic selection tools, which enable the selection of animals based on genetic markers, will allow WorldFish to expand its GIFT research beyond a growth-only focus and introduce selection for characteristics that are otherwise difficult to measure, such as resilience and feed efficiency. Genomic selection has enabled a step change in the rate of genetic improvement of terrestrial livestock, and has the potential to do the same in fish.

Expansion of GIFT research is a key part of the CGIAR Research Program on fish (FISH) and supports WorldFish efforts under its sustainable aquaculture program to increase the productivity of small-scale aquaculture to meet growing global demand for fish.

John Benzie, Program Leader, Sustainable Aquaculture, WorldFish: “Incorporating new traits in the breeding program for GIFT will help fish farmers prepare for future challenges such as climate change and increasing evidence of disease risks. This will particularly benefit farmers in Africa and Asia, where tilapia is critical for food security yet farmers often have limited access to improved fish breeds suited to local conditions.”

Ross Houston, Group Leader, The Roslin Institute: “Aquaculture production needs to increase by 40 percent by 2030 to meet global demands for fish. Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is arguably the world’s most important food fish, and plays a key role in tackling rural poverty in developing countries. The innovations in genetic improvement mapped out in this workshop are an important step toward achieving these ambitious goals.”

Attendees of the workshop included experts from WorldFish’s Malaysian and Egyptian bases, The Roslin Institute, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The University of Stirling’s Institute of Aquaculture, the Earlham Institute, CIRAD and the Animal Breeding and Genetics group of Wageningen University and Research.

The roadmap will feed into a strategy for the genetic improvement and dissemination of GIFT seed in Africa, the further development of which will take place at the Genetics Network meeting being hosted by WorldFish at the World Aquaculture 2017 conference in Cape Town on 26–30 June.

For more information or to request an interview contact:

Toby Johnson, Head of Communications
Mobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606
Email: t.johnson@cgiar.org
Web: worldfishcenter.org
Photography: flickr.com/photos/theworldfishcenter/

About WorldFish
WorldFish is an international, nonprofit research organization that harnesses the potential of fisheries and aquaculture to reduce hunger and poverty. Globally, more than one billion poor people obtain most of their animal protein from fish and 800 million depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. WorldFish is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future.

About CGIAR
CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partners.

Adding Value to African Aquaculture Production

BioMar Group has an increasing presence in Africa and is now launching a complete high performing range for tilapia and African catfish for African markets.

Africa is a continent with huge demands for more food, produced in a responsible and sustainable way. “We believe that aquaculture is one of the answers to this demand”, said Ole Christensen, Vice President for BioMar’s EMEA division. “BioMar Group has ambitious targets and initiatives for shaping an efficient and sustainable global aquaculture in collaboration with the entire aquaculture value chain.”

In recent years, the growth of African catfish and tilapia farming has increased particularly in the African markets. For many years, BioMar has served the African markets from France by offering high performing starter and grower diets for these species. As farms become increasingly intensive, the need for a diet targeted for broodstock has grown. To meet this demand, BioMar France now expands its product range to cover all nutritional needs of these species at all stages of their life cycle by introducing broodstock feed type EFICO Genio 838F, available for all tilapia and African catfish farmers in Africa and other markets served by BioMar’s EMEA division.

As in Africa, tilapia is also a popular aquaculture species in Central America. Cross-utilising knowledge and expertise in aquafeed across borders and continents is one of BioMar’s important strengths, and it was central in developing BioMar’s feed range for tilapia. Global R&D at BioMar has in close collaboration with our unit in Costa Rica carried out research on this species and developed high value feed types, which have been fine-tuned by working in close collaboration with an intensive tilapia farm.

Tilapia in net (credit Biomar)

“The goal of broodstock feed EFICO Genio 838F is to increase reproduction capacity”, said Michel Autin, Technical Director of BioMar EMEA. “The vitamin mix and levels are fine-tuned to promote an increase in the number of females actively spawning.  Our newly developed broodstock feed has a formulation that includes the necessary protein and vitamin balances, which contributes to increased spawning frequency, hatchability, and survival of fry.“ The EFICO Genio 838F includes the probiotic Bactocell®* and immune modulating ingredients similar to BioMar’s EFICO Genio broodstock feeds for trout, sea bass and sea bream to improve survival and boost the immune system.

“These efforts have been of great value to the development of the feeds offered by BioMar for warm freshwater fish like tilapia and African catfish”, said Michel Autin. “And now we can, for the first time, provide a broodstock diet that is specialized for warm freshwater fish whose natural diet is largely plant based.”

African aquaculture production is expanding in various ways and into various species. BioMar’s presence in Africa steadily grows. The markets served by BioMar are not limited to tilapia and catfish. “We have for many years also supplied feed to a growing number of sea bass and sea bream farms based in Northern African countries. We aim to add value to African aquaculture production. We listen to and react based on the needs of our customers as we want to act as a locally responsive, agile, and specialized aquaculture feed provider, building our efforts on the four fundamental pillars: Innovation, Performance, Sustainability, and Cooperation,” Ole Christensen concluded.

* Bactocell® is the only probiotic approved by the European Commission for inclusion in fish feed.

For further information please contact:

Vice President, BioMar EMEA Division

Ole Christensen
Email: och@biomar.com

Technical Director, BioMar EMEA Division

Michel Autin
Email: michel.autin@biomar.fr

Tilapia Market Expects Reduction in Tilapia Price to Boost Demand Significantly

The Tilapia Market deals with the development and distribution of the cichlid fish. Tilapia fingerlings belong to tribe known as tilapiine cichlid and number in around 100 different species. Fresh tilapia are largely restricted to freshwater bodies like ponds, lakes and rivers.

The Tilapia Market has recently come into prominence as the fields of aquaculture and aquaponics gain in size and revenue. Tilapia farming is extremely popular owing to the low price of live tilapia, ease of preparing tilapia food due to its boneless nature and its mildness as far as taste is concerned. The low tilapia price has ensure that it is usually among the top 5 fresh seafood varieties consumed in the US.

Scope & Regional Forecast of the Tilapia Market

In recent years, the Tilapia Market has witnessed that fresh tilapia species from North Africa are most popular on a commercial basis. This popularity is due to peculiar characteristics like rapid pace of growth, high tolerance to density of stocking, and high levels of adaptability. This species is pretty popular in Asia. On the other hand, the US is a very popular destination for frozen tilapia. China is not only the leading exporter of this variety, but also of whole tilapia.

Traditionally, the European Union has been a big market for fresh seafood. But in recent times, imports have declined as only Germany and Netherlands are exhibiting a strong appetite for tilapia fingerlings. Vietnam’s tilapia farming operations has received a significant amount of encouragement from the government in the form of various initiatives and research studies. Supply links between various major parties like producers, processors and international distributors have also been strengthened in the country.

While there is heavy competition for other cheap fish varieties, the demand for live tilapia is expected to hold steady. The demand is also expected to spike on an annual basis due to the Chinese New Year.

Segmentations & Key Manufacturers Involved in the Tilapia Market

The Tilapia Market can be broken down into various segmentations on the basis of –

Manufacturer: China, Egypt, USA, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Ecuador, Myanmar, Malaysia, Uganda and Bangladesh.

Application: Household Consumption and Business.

Type: Tilapia and Tilapia Fillet.

Geographical Location: North America (USA, Canada and Mexico), Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) and Latin America, Middle East and Africa.

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